• Stains on your clothes-┬áDeodorants are not meant to be sprayed on your clothes. A deodorant often takes an average of 30 seconds to absorb adequately into your skin. If your deodorant comes into contact with your clothing before it’s absorbed into your skin, it can bleed onto your shirts and tops and stain them. If you apply too much deodorant it makes it more likely to stain your clothes. White stick deodorants or the roll-ons can create rather stubborn stains that are difficult to remove. Some deodorants can even have a lightning effect on colored fabrics or a yellowing effect on white fabrics. So, therefore make sure whenever you spray a deodorant on yourself, your skin shouldn’t be covered with clothes.
  • Deodorants can cause skin discomfort-┬áDeodorants are applied to keep away the smell caused by the sweat bacteria, sweat is actually odorless, but the bacteria that eat it make it stink. Deodorants make your skin acidic so it can stamp out the foul-smelling bacteria. However, making the skin of your under arms acidic can come at a cost. Very strong deodorants can irritate your skin in a variety of ways: they can make your skin itchy, cause a rash to develop or cause your skin to become excessively dry and flaky. However, you can fight this problem by applying your women’s deodorant from an appropriate distance from your underarm area. You should not spray the anti-per spirant directly on the targeted area but should be sprayed from the distance so that it doesn’t acidify it!